Journey of my cardiac arrhythmia and pacemaker.

The worst part is knowing that’ll be me in about 8 years…

(Source: tobethebestsurgeon)

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Posted
1 year ago

My Pacemaker Birthday is coming up! Get Excited!

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1 year ago
aestheticgirl:

This is just amazing to me. Perfect contrast.

aestheticgirl:

This is just amazing to me. Perfect contrast.

(Source: )

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1 year ago
Yes…… I stole my surgery gown when i was high on pain killers and I sometimes wear it as a nightgown…..especially when i wear holter monitors. 

Yes…… I stole my surgery gown when i was high on pain killers and I sometimes wear it as a nightgown…..especially when i wear holter monitors. 

Posted
1 year ago
this is actually kind of weird to me….don’t know how I feel about it. 

this is actually kind of weird to me….don’t know how I feel about it. 

(Source: blogfordrummers)

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1 year ago
blacquebird asked: Hey! How are you doing? I'm surfing the pacemaker tag and found your blog. Love it, by the way. It's so honest. I'm supposed to be having a pacer implanted soon, but my parents are really apprehensive about letting me get it.. Even though I'm 20 years old. How did your parents deal with it?


Answer:

Hey! Im doing good so far. Thanks for reading! Welcome to the PACEMAKER CLUB HOLLA!….. and welcome to the world of endless searches for pacemaker and medical blogs if you haven’t been introduced before haha.

 Parents are rough to say the least. They are there when you need them and sometimes there when you don’t, especially in situations like this. (think awkward medical questions when the rents are in the room…)

My dad has a medical background so it was actually a lot easier in some aspects and harder in others when going through the decision process. I knew from my dad the negative effects really well before I went through with it. It was a really rushed decision made within a week which looking back; sucks. My Mom was sort of out of the picture through the whole thing up to surgery because she was at home whilst my Dad was with me in New Orleans where I go to school and had all my treatments,tests and surgery done. 

So my Mom would put her two cents in but at the end of the day, but it was really my opinion even after much talk with my dad about it. My dad and I were really apprehensive about it too. Who wouldn’t be? They said they could give me medicine and that would help but since it does serious business, it would have serious side affects. I decided after about 3 days there was no way in hell I would continue taking that medicine day after day. The medicine for me made me so nauseous and tired and my eyesight was so blurry I couldn’t see anything that was close to my face and had to hold it away to see it properly. After that I quit it and scheduled the surgery. 

Its your decision to get it done ultimately, you just have to weigh your options and I did that with the help of my parents and it hasn’t been a smooth road, but an okay one. No bumps I couldn’t handle and you’ll be just fine. 

My parents were really supportive of the whole process and I thank them for it but they’ll be even more involved later on I’m sure. Some people’s treatment ends with the implantation whilst others discover further problems but ultimately the pacemaker will be able to tell that way better than a holter monitor and you can drive once you get it implanted…. haha. 

Please let me know if you have any other questions, I love em! Hope everything goes well!

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Posted
1 year ago

February 2cd, 2012: PACEMAKER SURGERY

     The big day had finally come. I was all set to have my surgery. I arrived at the hospital that I now knew like the back of my hand. I was there with my mother who had joined my dad and I the previous day. We surprisingly didn’t have to wait long to go into surgery. Just from my experience with having to wait in line for over 30 appointments those couple weeks in different departments within different clinics and at two different locations, the more severe meant the less you had to wait. Or did I just get really good at waiting in line behind men and women all over the age of 70? 

     For the surgery I was asked to change into a gown and answer a whole bunch of different questions that I assumed they would know since they ask them all the time. They were the standard questions you get at a routinely physical exam. Not all of the questions are appropriate to answer in front of your parents either. One thing that I hated about this whole process was that I had to expose every detail about myself day in and day in. I had to undress for countless nurses and have needles shoved into my arms almost every single appointment. The physical exposure is annoying but then the staff starts to ask so many personal questions. I can answer the personal questions but not with my parents sitting a foot away. Maybe it was the departments own ignorance that they couldn’t catch onto my discomfort.  If you think about it, it makes sense. They are so use to only seeing men and women over the age of 70 that those patients have nothing to hide. Who are they going to hide from? Themselves or their spouses who they have been married to for 40+ years. Luckily when my parents heard the question “Is there any chance you may be pregnant? We want you to pee in a cup just in case”, they left for a cup of coffee. 

   After being prepped for surgery, they took my on a gurney over to the operating room and put me on the table. It was about 20 more minutes of small talk while my chest was exposed with multiple iv’s being hooked up to me till they were ready. I felt something tingly crawl along my veins and up my arms. Before I realized, I was fast asleep. 

Posted
1 year ago
That was my “Before Picture”. It was just my chest obviously. It was was too early in the morning for me to be taking pictures of myself. All my hospital photos are horrible. I am either tired and lethargic or high on hydrocodone. 

That was my “Before Picture”. It was just my chest obviously. It was was too early in the morning for me to be taking pictures of myself. All my hospital photos are horrible. I am either tired and lethargic or high on hydrocodone. 

Posted
1 year ago

Day Before Surgery

That time leading up to surgery I was surprisingly very calm. I didn’t have a care in the world at that point. All I wanted was a chocolate milkshake to be honest. When I look back on it, I think I truly didn’t have enough time to get scared. If I was scared how would that look? I had already cried myself to sleep alone the first night. I think if I had more time or at least had been home and not preoccupied with several hundred doctors appointments and random tests and had wires attached to every part of my body I might have actually been more scared. Weird. With so much commotion going on, every part of my mind was 100% focused on that second and not a second into the future or the past. All I wanted to do in my down time was make up the hours of sleep that I had lost over the past couple of weeks. In the end, sleep was ultimately my cure to not being scared for the most part.

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Posted
1 year ago